Backcountry Adventure in the South Chilcotins

Backcountry Adventure in the South Chilcotins

oo busy working, fixing your bike, and looking after the kids all week to plan your riding getaway this weekend? This article series does all that work for you. We give you 4 different trip itineraries, each one showcasing a unique riding experience in the Sea to Sky. Every itinerary is designed for a different type of rider and a distinct experience, they are curated around a 3.5 day get-away and are designed to be “grab and go”. We aren’t taking bribes or getting paid by businesses to tell you where to go, we just live here, like these spots, and think you will too.

Changing Beats in Powell River

Changing Beats in Powell River

‘Some of the best loamy rides in the west, hundreds of kilometers of singletrack and no crowds. Powell River charges onto the mountain bike scene with challenging, technical and fast trails through Coast Mountains rainforest. Maintained by a thriving scene of committed local riders and trail builders, Powell River mountain biking trails are blowing visitors away with the amazing quality and volume of singletrack.’ ~ Trailforks

Accessing the Remote Reaches of BC’s Chilcotin Single-Track

Accessing the Remote Reaches of BC’s Chilcotin Single-Track

Words and Photos by Sam Egan British Columbia’s Chilcotin region is a wild pocket of mountains and forest, lakes and rivers, and some of the most remote single track in the province. Warner Lake was our trailhead destination, tucked into the South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park northwest of Gold Bridge, and a float plane chartered through Tyax Adventures was our shuttle vehicle for the adventure ahead. We arrived the night before our flight, just as the sun was setting behind the rolling hills of Tyaughton Lake, and snagged a few spots at the closest of the many Recreation Site camping areas en route to Tyax Lodge. With a 7:30am flight the following morning promising at least 50km of backcountry terrain to cover, we retreated to our tents early after briefly reviewing route options and gear choices for the following day. Catching the first flight of the day proved a bit awkward, with the lodge still sleeping there was no one to consult on protocol until we were already late for our ascent. Scrambling to disassemble wheels from frames and pack everything into the little plane, camera bags and phones were mostly locked out-of-reach in the scramble to get going. There wouldn’t be much of a view until we reached the alpine anyways, as shifting overnight winds had blown in smoke from forest fires elsewhere in the province.   After leaving the smoke behind in the valley below and double-checking ten wheels, five bikes and five packs were on the lakeshore, our pilot bid us farewell and expertly sailed into the horizon. One member of our party had completed the...